Home Daddy Cool Ψηφιακός κουμπαράς για τα παιδιά από την Credit Suisse

Ψηφιακός κουμπαράς για τα παιδιά από την Credit Suisse

by nikosmoumouris

Η ελβετική τράπεζα Credit Suisse λανσάρει το Digipigi, τον ψηφιακό της κουμπαρά που απευθύνεται σε παιδιά 12 ετών. Τι γυρεύουν παιδιά αυτής της ηλικίας και μικρότερα με μια τράπεζα, θα πείτε.
Η Credit Suisse φαίνεται να έχει πάρει πολυ στα σοβαρά το να είναι γνωστή στο νεανικό κοινό και για τον λόγο αυτό έχει αναπτύξει μια σειρά υπηρεσιών υπό μια ομπρέλα που την ονομάζει Viva Kids. Μέσα από σχετικές εφαρμογές “ένα παιδι μαθαίνει να χειρίζεται με διασκεδαστικό τρόπο τα χρήματα” και κάπως έτσι μαθαίνουμε πως υπάρχει διασκεδαστικός τρόπος χρήσης των χρημάτων που εγκρίνει μια μεγάλη τράπεζα. Γιατί οι μεγάλοι πρέπει να τα αντιμετωπίζουμε με σοβαρότητα δεν μας λέει, τέλος πάντων…
Η τράπεζα λανσάρει σχετικές Digipigi εφαρμογές για το iOS και το Android όπου -όπως λέει η Credit Suisse- τα παιδιά μπορούν να μαθαίνουν για το χρήμα, την αποταμίευση και το πώς ξοδεύεται (φρέσκο όπως τα ψάρια είναι άραγε σωστή απάντηση;).
Όλα αυτά είναι διαθέσιμα στην Ελβετία, αλλά θα πρέπει κάποια στιγμή να τα περιμένουμε και εδώ. Άλλωστε υπάρχει αρκετός χώρος για να καλυφθεί, αφού ο μπλε κουμπαράς του Ταμιευτηρίου είναι πια μουσειακό έκθεμα.
 

You may also like

3 comments

Meris Michaels 20/11/2017 - 19:56

We hope that the Digipigi will never come to Greece! We see several safety issues with Digipigi. First, placing a toy or tablet connected to Wi-Fi or a smartphone in the hands of a young child exposes him to radiofrequency radiation which can generate certain health effects. It encourages a child’s use of digital tech from a very young age which could lead to developmental problems. According to the “Terms and License Notes” of the Kids Viva Banking Package, Crédit Suisse “tracks users’ behavior in the Digipigi apps and Digipigi money box together with the related personal information and stores this data on servers in Switzerland for five years” for purposes of marketing products to children. Please read: https://mieuxprevenir.blogspot.ch/2017/11/digipigi-potential-health-risk-to.html. Thank you.
(We regret we cannot write in Greek.)

Reply
Nikos Moumouris 20/11/2017 - 21:54

Thanks for getting in touch! I doubt the adverse effects as we would be all dead by now, scientific bodies and regulators have provided guidelines and I don’t see how something that emits in frequencies lower than the visible light can harm but I agree that no device should be used as “mechanical nanny”. It should be used though with the proper guidance as window to the world from a certain age and above. Many great things on nature are on YouTube for example. Now, as for the privacy concerns, I cannot argue, in fact my French is very rusty 🙂 but what was the purpose of the brief story is to show that even traditional institutions attempt to reach (or lure) the youth, which is interesting from a marketing perspective but, I think we will agree here, poses challenges that must be addressed.
Nikos Moumouris, for mydad.gr

Reply
Meris Michaels 21/11/2017 - 19:27

I appreciate your comment about the “marketing perspective” of certain connected toys, but rather disagree with what you say about EM radiation. You might be interested in this article from the Environmental Health Trust which one of the main advocacy groups in North America:
https://ehtrust.org/athens-medical-association-recommends-reducing-electromagnetic-wireless-radiation-protect-public-health/

Reply

Leave a Comment